Video Etiquette Part 4

Simple Etiquette Tips for Better Video Conferencing
Part 4: Common Challenges

Look at the camera
A key value of video conferencing is that you get visual cues that lead to stronger communication. One of the most critical contributors to credibility in communication is the ability to make eye contact–so make sure you are looking at the camera. After you’ve used the picture-in-picture to make sure your view is as it should be, turn it off so you aren’t distracted by seeing yourself on the screen. Be thoughtful if you are looking at both a video monitor and a computer monitor–it can be distracting for others when you are presenting a profile view. Try to keep your plane of view more constant.

Don’t cheat and do audio only
Everyone has “off” days, but that doesn’t mean you should hide. If you are a remote worker, apply the “what would I do if I was in the office” test. If you were there in person at HQ, would you hide in your cubicle and not attend the meeting in the conference room with everyone else? A bad hair day shouldn’t keep you off video, just as mismatched socks don’t keep you from joining the team brainstorm. The power of videoconferencing gets lost if you opt out.

As we’ve said before, if you wouldn’t do it in person, don’t do it on video. And this is particularly true of non-verbal noises and expressions, like chewing.

Coming Up: 

Part 1: Before Your Start | Part 2: Test It First | Part 3: In the Call | Part 4: Common Challenges | Part 5: Working from Usual and Unusual Locations